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The Practice Flowchart

The Practice Flowchart was borne out of, again, watching students struggle with making enough progress from week to week.  I had many discussion with students, discovering not just how long they practice for, but how they practice, and whether they were working as effectively as they could be.

The flowchart was conceived when asked myself what I actually do when I’m practising.  To be more precise, I asked myself specific questions, and made a chart out of my answers…

  • How do I decide what to practice?
    • I sometimes have some ideas already in mind when I first sit at the piano, but if I don’t then I play through the music whilst listening critically, and make decisions then.

 

  • How do I decide how to split it into sections?
    • I very quickly work out how much I can manage at one time that would give me a reasonable challenge without making it feel like an impossible mountain to climb.   Sometimes that’s as little as a bar, or even half a bar.  More often, it’ll be a phrase or group of phrases, or a single hand, or a single voice.  Sometimes my sections can be thought of as horizontal sections rather than vertical (i.e. an entire left hand, rather than a single bar of something). 
    • Sections are often worked out on the hoof…. I’ll be playing through something, and when it gets to a point where I’m not achieving what I want to, I isolate the problem area and treat that as a section.

 

  • How do I know when something is ‘good enough’ and when it needs more work?
    • This is an interesting one because I wasn’t really sure of the answer until I sat down at the piano and practiced with this in mind.  The results rather surprised me; I kept going at a section, not until I could play it particularly well or up to tempo, or anything like that, but until I felt like I knew what I was doing.  Hesitations, to me, were a sign of ‘not knowing’, as were those tiny little muscle movements where a finger begins to aim for a wrong note before diverting to the right one. 

 

  • What do I do when things are not going well?
    • Another interesting one.  I’d be lying if I said that I always achieve what I set out to do; sometimes (often!) things just don’t work. Sometimes I get frustrated, sometimes I feel like I’m taking steps backwards, sometimes my playing just will not improve.  So what do I do? I walk away.  I try something else.  I know I can come back to the task that I couldn’t yet manage, and when I do it’ll be with a fresher mind, and without frustration or annoyance. This part, I think, is so important it’s worth mentioning twice…

‘When I cannot do something after repeatedly trying it, I walk away’.

Once I had these answers worked out, designing the flowchart was easy; it really is just a graphic illustration of these questions and their answers.

The ‘confidence score’ section is vital for a student to understand; that they are scoring their playing not on how it sounded, but on how they felt when they played it.  This is probably particularly important at the beginning of a piece, when the sounds we are making are so departed from the sound of a performance (because of slow tempo, or hands separate, or the tiny size of a section, or the isolation/separation of voices), that the student has to understand that they are rating how well they felt they knew what they were doing at the specific task they were working on.  For instance, if a student is working on simply getting the notes correct, they may play with faltering rhythm, but this does not matter, as the goal is notes, and nothing else.   You will also notice, that 8/10 is an excellent score; students should not feel they have to aim for a 10 (remember that Practice Makes Perfect is just a myth, and a destructive one at that.)

The walking away is a vital lesson for a student to learn.  Frustration is a horrible feeling, and isn’t helpful for anybody.  The flowchart has an escape loop slotted in – so if something isn’t working after 10 times of trying, a student should find something else to do…

You can always come back to something that didn’t progress, or that got better but was still not well enough ‘known’ to feel confident!

 

 For more details about my teaching practice, including prices, vacancies, and information on distance theory marking, or learning piano as a beginner, intermediate, or a post-grade 8 student, please go to lynnephillipspiano.moonfuit.com

 

 

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The Practice Pie

This is the first instalment of The Practice Project, and I’m going to kick-off with the Practice Pie.  This is designed for students who don’t practice enough, or who practice a lot of one thing but never move forward with other skills.

The Practice Pie works by taking an average half hour practise session and splitting it into its component parts; for my students this usually boils down to one or two pieces, a study or two, and some scales & arpeggios.  The Practice Pie is meant to be flexible, not just for actual content, but length of content as well (for example. a young 6 year old beginner would not be expected to practice for a full 30 minutes, and probably would not have enough repertoire to cover that 30 minutes even if they were, whereas a more advanced student would need considerable more than 30 minutes to progress).

The idea of the Pie is to make a practice session as accessible as possible by seeing it as small do-able chunks rather than one enormous inaccessible pie.  Students who balk at the idea of 30 minutes hard graft are often more amenable to the idea of working for a timed 5 or 10 minutes on something.  (I advise students to use a timer here, so they can get a real sense of achievement when that timer goes off for their 5 minutes work – but it has to be set for each chunk, not the whole session as a whole… remember the importance of accessible, achievable and do-able).

  • ‘Chunk it down’ – break the practice into accessible sections
  • Time it! – Use a timer to stay motivated, and to give regular breaks and a sense of achievement
  • Be flexible – Adjust the Pie to suit the needs of the individual student
  • Break it up – Nobody set a law that says 30 minutes practice has to all be done in one go – use the Pie to keep track of a practice that is done in different sections throughout the day

Coming Soon –  The Practice Flowchart, and the first video of my own practice sessions.

 

For more details about my teaching practice, including prices, vacancies, and information on distance theory marking, or learning piano as a beginner, intermediate, or a post-grade 8 student, please go to lynnephillipspiano.moonfuit.com

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New Resources

This summer has seen me working on a few smaller projects – mostly getting together some strategy sheets for ABRSM theory exams, but also working on some different styles of ‘notebooking’ for helping students to organise their practising.

ABRSM grade 4 Strategy Sheets are designed to act as revision aids, and to help with revisiting topics covered in lessons.  Although they are not extensive enough to teach the topics if a student has not already covered them, they do go into some depth with how to work through each subject area, and include several clearly bullet-pointed step-by-step guides on how to approach each question.

Practise Charts for absolute beginners and slightly more intermediate learners are designed to help students with organising not only each practise session but also to organise their week.  These are simple charts, clearly coloured, with room for a teacher to jot down key points to work on.  These are particularly useful for beginners who find struggle with organisational skills, or with remembering specific goals for their music.

If you would like the original Powerpoint documents of the Practise Charts, do feel free to email me and request them; the PDF files are locked, but the Powerpoint can be adjusted for each student and each situation.

All three learning resources can be found permanently under the Student Resources tab

 

For more details about my teaching practice, including prices, vacancies, and information on distance theory marking, or learning piano as a beginner, intermediate, or a post-grade 8 student, please go to lynnephillipspiano.moonfuit.com

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